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Classically Inspired: Ring of Power

March 27th, 2018

{photo on MaxPixel / CC0 Public Domain}

Hey SLOCA parents! Here's a reminder to enter our Reading Resolutions giveaway for a chance to win a gift card to the school store – all you have to do is take a photo of your current book stack and email it to Down Home. See this post for all the details. The last day to enter is April 6th.


Our high school students are even finding connections between ancient tales and modern stories! Here’s one sent in by a SLOCA high schooler:

This is the beginning of a story illustrating the nature of man when he attains power, told in Plato’s Republic about a shepherd who worked for the king of Lydia:

“There came to pass a great thunderstorm and an earthquake; the earth cracked and a chasm opened at the place where he was pasturing. He saw it, wondered at it, and went down. He saw, along with other quite wonderful things about which they tell tales, a hollow bronze horse. It had windows; peeping in, he saw there was a corpse inside that looked larger than human size. It had nothing on except a gold ring on its hand; he slipped it off and went out. When there was the usual gathering of the shepherds to make the monthly report to the king about the flocks, he too came, wearing the ring. Now, while he was sitting with the others, he chanced to turn the collet of the ring to himself, toward the inside of his hand; when he did this, he became invisible to those sitting by him, and they discussed him as though he were away. He wondered at this, and, fingering the ring again, he twisted the collet toward the outside; when he had twisted it, he became visible. Thinking this over, he tested whether the ring had this power, and that was exactly his result: when he turned the collet inward, he became invisible, when outward, visible.”

~ Plato’s Republic

And of course we have this famous ring of invisibility (Gollum in this scene might be scary for young children):

 

So fun! Keep looking for these connections, and share them with our community - email downhome@sloclassical.org.

 
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